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The Cheap, Easy-To-Make Survival Lamp Your Great-Grandparents Used

The Cheap, Easy-To-Make Survival Lamp Your Great-Grandparents Used

Imagine you are sitting in a log cabin, or perhaps hunkered down in a lean-to or some other makeshift shelter in the woods. It’s dark, and you’d like more light than your fire provides so you can do some chores.

Maybe you are mending your socks, or sewing a button back in place, enjoying a meal, or just trying to do a little reading before bed. Or maybe you are in a survival situation, and have lost modern means of lighting, or the grid has gone down, and your rural homestead still needs lighting. Or maybe you just like the tools and skills of the past. Either way, it’s dark and you want some light. There are a number of traditional means of lighting your home or shelter, ranging from kerosene lamps, to wax or tallow candles, to the often-forgotten tallow lamp.

Illumination through combustion was the first way our ancestors fought off the darkness, starting with fires and torches, and reaching a point of refinement with pressurized white gas and propane before the electric light won out in the end.

Until petroleum refining took off in the mid-19th century, natural fats and oils provided that illumination. In the Middle East, olive oil was a popular illuminating oil, and at one time, whale oil lit the homes of the well-to-do and wealthy in Europe and America. However, by and large for the common person, candles provided that light. But hunters, natives and the very poor knew of another light that could be as simple as placing melted tallow (a rendered form of fat) in a shallow dish and setting it alight, or using a bit of cloth or porous fiber, string, twine, etc., to serve as a wick. It is a traditional method of lighting that has existed for thousands of years.

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These very simple lights can be made from material readily found in the wilderness, and a tablespoon or so of tallow has been shown to provide useful light for about 45 minutes, making it perfect for working on evening tasks before bed, or even just a few minutes with your Bible or another book. Like all simple tools, the tallow lamp can seem more complex than it really is to our modern mind, so let’s take a look at a common way of making them.

Seashells were one way of holding the tallow, but you also could do it with a piece of bark, a stone with a hollow in it, a small dish, or really anything capable of holding the tallow. For a wick, an inch or two of simple string or twine will suffice, as will a strip of scrap cloth.

Melt the tallow and pour it around your wick (it can be laying sideways if needed), or even press unmelted tallow or fat around the wick. You also can run the wick through a button that will hold it upright in the pool of tallow (a so-called button lamp) and make it a bit more efficient.

What you get with just a minute or two of work is a crude, but effective, lamp. This would not be suitable as your primary lighting source unless you had no other choice, but it becomes invaluable for the stranded hunter or in a total societal collapse. (It’s a great way to use up rancid or heavily used cooking fats, though.)

One of the biggest drawbacks to the tallow lamp, aside from the low levels of light it produces and the fact that it is both smoky and can put out an odor, is that it demands the use of edible fats. You can make lamps along these lines with any kind of natural oil, and as we all know (or should know) fats are very important in a survival situation. Fat consumption provides valuable caloric energy, so this puts tallow lamps strictly in the realm of something to use when you have a sufficient fat supply.

Making tallow lamps isn’t hard. While they are not the greatest source of light, they are more than sufficient for personal use, and are a useful tool when you have no other source of light.

Have you ever made a tallow lamp? Share your tips in the section below:

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4 comments

  1. this is also know as a “Betty Lamp”. I saw this years ago on a Canadian TV show as being used in a snow cave using a Altoids tin, Vaseline jelly and a bit of cotton cord. It warmed up the snow cave and was used to melt snow for drinking water

  2. Bacon grease left over from frying bacon, Crisco or other shortning, Vegetable oil used for cooking, all can be used in this type of emergency lamp (Betty lamp) though they sometimes smoke.
    Used motor oil, new motor oil, and 3 in 1 oil, can also be used but smokes a lot. (Never but never use Gasoline). My favorite is vegetable oil used for cooking.
    The best of all is a big bottle of smokeless lamp oil purchased from any good hardware store. make sure the label says smokeless. It is designed to be used in regular glass lamps. It burns the brightest and does not smoke at all and a bottle lasts forever almost. It comes in great big bottles for about $7.00. Some vegetable oils made for cooking also does not smoke and burns bright. I have use this a lot.
    You can also stick a piece of string or a strip of cloth down in a Crisco can full of Crisco or other vegetable shortniing and that works as both a lamp and a heater.

  3. Kind of an odd idea, but this came from some survival website.

    Take a can of tuna packed in oil and use a nail to punch a hole in the middle of the top. Push a piece of wick down into the hole until it’s soaked with the oil. Light.

    I’m thinking you can eat the tuna later after the oil runs out since I’d pour the oil out anyway.

  4. The candle will not smoke / soot / smell if you keep the wick properly adjusted. Vegetable oil is so pure, the wick must be kept short. Ive found nothing burns better than bacon fat. Not even parrafin

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