Privacy   |    Financial   |    Current Events   |    Self Defense   |    Miscellaneous   |    Letters To Editor   |    About Off The Grid News   |    Off The Grid Videos   |    Weekly Radio Show

Letters To The Editor

Dear Editor,

What is meant by living “off the grid”? What grid are you talking about? The electrical grid?

Curious

Dear Curious,

When we say living “off the grid” we mean living with a measure of self-sufficiency so that when those technological marvels that we’ve grown accustomed to (such as electricity) fail, we can still survive. It’s a back-to-basics lifestyle that allows us to live even if we have no power, no food on the grocery store shelves, limited means of communications, and any other modern conveniences that might be swept away in an instant. As we’ve seen with even natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina and the earthquakes in Japan and New Zealand, whole communities can be thrown back to the Dark Ages in just a matter of moments. Preparedness—off the grid living—gives us a measure of control over our environment when modern civilization breaks down.

The Editor

===============================================
===============================================

Dear Editor,

Can you address a question I have regarding canning vs. freezing of produce? If I am interested in preserving the nutritional value of home grown produce, which preserves more of the “fresh” nutritional value? I am aware of the storage issues of freezing, such as potential loss of electricity, and I have several options for “free energy” back up power, but please address for me the question of impact on retention of nutritional value.

Canning Newbie

Dear Canning Newbie,

It’s been a long-held belief that canning somehow reduces the nutritional value of the foods. However, recent studies have shown that those nutrients that do leach out are still within the surrounding liquid of the food. Incorporating that liquid into your meal will retain whatever minor loss of nutrients that occurs. In fact, canning has been shown to make many of our food’s nutrients even more available for our bodies to use, in an easier-to-digest form. Many foods are actually more nutritious after canning.

The Editor

If you’d like to contact the editor, please send an email to [email protected]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!