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Letters To The Editor

Dear Editor:
How would you bury something and be able to retrieve it later out of cold, frozen ground? Also, do you have ideas on good places to bury something?
P—

Dear P—,
There are several methods for retrieving something you’ve buried from cold, frozen dirt. Unfortunately, none of the methods will be very quick, so patience will be the order of the day. You can try a pickaxe to first break through the frozen dirt to see just how deep your frost line is. If it’s not very deep, then digging out enough with the pickaxe and continuing with post hole diggers or a shovel would be the quickest route. If your ground seems pretty rock solid for a ways down, you might have to just build a fire over the spot you want to dig in. It doesn’t have to be a big fire, but you’ll need enough wood for it to burn for several hours. Depending how deep the frost line is, you might have to rebuild the fire farther down in the hole as you work your way through.

As far as burying things, there are so many variables in designing a cache and choosing a cache site that it really can’t be covered in one small paragraph on this page. I would suggest purchasing a copy of Hide Your Guns: Off-Grid Survival Caches. It will give you the information you need to construct caches and how to decide on a place to bury them.

Thank you for writing,
The Editor

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Dear Editor:

I read your article on genetically modified corn and noticed the last passing mention of canola oil, but was not sure if you were saying the same problem exists with commercial canola oil. We eat very few processed foods, but I do cook with canola oil. Is this a problem?
Concerned

Dear Concerned,
Yes, the majority of canola oil comes from genetically modified crops. Canola comes from the rapeseed plant, and right now 82% of that grown in Canada is from GMO crops and 95% of that grown in the USA is from GMO crops. If you’re trying to limit your exposure to GMO foods, then canola oil is a big offender (unless you find a brand that specifically states it comes from non-GMO sources).

https://www.gmo-compass.org/eng/agri_biotechnology/gmo_planting/344.genetically_modified_rapeseed_global_area_under_cultivation.html

Thank you for writing,
The Editor

If you’d like to contact the editor, please send an email to [email protected]

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