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The 10 Best Hunting Rifles: The Browning BAR .30-06

When you have the accuracy of a bolt action, the ease of use of a semi-auto, and the looks of one of the finest rifles made, you have a piece of art capable of the highest level of function. The Browning BAR is about as highly touted a rifle as exists, and it has the real chops to assure your success in the field.

The Rifle: Browning BAR .30-06

The Caliber: .30-06

The Animal: Anything that moves between 125 and 750 pounds (although you can use it for varmints also)

The Rifle – Browning BAR

When you have the best reputation in the industry for smooth function, fit, and finish, you can charge more than the other guys and expect to consistently get it.  A BAR comes in around $1200 to $1400, depending on who you know or who owes you a favor.  Almost twice the cost of the Remington but with none of the stigma that has been attached in the past to the feeding problems of the 740/7400 series, this firearm has a nearly flawless record of functionality and form.  It’s simple but great looking, finished well, and the attention to detail is almost on par with full custom jobs.

The specific rifle is the Browning model #031001231: a Browning BAR Safari with the BOSS system installed for fine-tuning accuracy.  It features a blued steel receiver with scrolled engraving pre-drilled and tapped for mounts, a hammer-forged 22-inch barrel with a total length of 43 inches, and a length of pull of 13 and ¾ inches in a 7-pound 6-ounce package.  The gas-operated rifle has a detachable box magazine and a recoil pad and sling swivels pre-installed with quality checkered glossy walnut furniture.

It oozes quality, surpassed only by its perfect functionality and out-of-the-box accuracy.  It is perhaps one of the mainstays of the hunting industry for more than just its brand name, though one can’t imagine it hurting its reputation by being a Browning, no matter where it is produced these days.  If you haven’t used one, it may be a bit difficult to understand why this gun is worth its relatively high price, but one day in the field or a couple hours on the range will easily clarify any lingering doubts.  It is perhaps not a first-time firearm, but it wouldn’t be a drawback for this to be the only rifle you own if you don’t have a need for higher-capacity magazines.  If you could pick a set of rules to buy a gun based on what makes it versatile and capable, the following would be excellent values:

  1. Excellent function and materials
  2. Great accuracy
  3. Fast follow up shots
  4. Versatile cartridge/chambering

This rifle exceeds the competition in all of these categories. It is an excellent primary gun with one of the most versatile cartridges on the planet, a semi-auto repeating capability, incredible accuracy, and some of the best materials and workmanship you can find.  To top it off, there are rifles in this model that haven’t EVER had a malfunction in several thousand rounds of firing.

What you get with this rifle is a true companion in the field, one which will not fail you when it’s needed.  In the end, it doesn’t hurt that it’s one of the most classic looking and nicely finished guns of the last fifty years.

The bad guys are getting desperate… learn how to keep your guns and valuables safe from thieves and gangs

The Caliber – .30-06

It’s not a point that can even be argued:  The .30-06 is one of the most versatile cartridges ever, with loads ranging from fast flat shooting varmint rounds to those with the knockdown power to drop a dangerous big game animal just about anywhere on six continents.  The seventh continent probably has a few animals that shouldn’t be considered with a medium bore caliber, but that’s a different story.  For the vast majority of rifle shooters who hunt, the .30-06 is matched in versatility by perhaps only two or three other cartridges (with the .308 and the .45-70 the only that usually come to mind).

It’s important to remember that this cartridge essentially built the hunting game in the United States, and it seems in fact to be a timeless piece of history and a contemporary performer all at once.

Standard rounds have an improved deviation of about 7 to 12% over a .308 factory load, which makes the difference in many hunters’ minds.  From a practical standpoint, the surplus ammunition in .30-06 is mostly dried up, and if it isn’t, then it’s old; whereas the .308 stuff is being made available every year.   The cost and availability of .30-06 is going to be higher and harder to get than .308 in any lean time.  Does that stop every hunter who has put the money into an ‘aught six over the years, from proclaiming the virtues of the round at every chance they get?  No way.  It’s almost as if they are trying to justify or prove to themselves that the .30-06 is as good as they think it is.  It’s funny really, because the round really is that good.  This article isn’t about ammo prices; it’s about the best cartridges, rifles, and game pairings extant.  In this protocol, the .30-06 has few contemporaries.  It certainly can outperform the .308 in factory loads and is almost as versatile. (Yes, there are a handful more loads available to the .308 than the .30-06, most of which do not exceed characteristics and ballistics of custom loads in .30-06—this is mostly a derivative of the longer case.)

It’s probably beside the point to extol the virtues of the round in this article, as there are millions of ballistic articles and twice that many forum posts with some guy from the Midwest talking about the amazing ‘aught six.  No one who has shot the .30-06 needs convincing—of that you can be sure.  Even if you want to hate the round you can’t: it’s too versatile, powerful and usable.

The Animal – Various Animals

This is another segment of this article that writes itself.  The range of animals that a .30-06 can dispatch effectively (neither under nor overkill) is ridiculous.  It’s easily one of the top four most versatile cartridges from factory, and it is infinitely more versatile when you mix in hand loads.

There is an important issue to tackle off the blocks here:  If you can’t hand load or won’t, then you won’t be getting the versatility for anything under 150 pounds or so. However, if you can and do hand load, you can get animals from fox and coyotes to bears.

Sabot enclosed rounds in 55 grains can take out a coyote with 4000 FPS and 2000 energy at the muzzle, which might seem like overkill but usually penetrate straight through.

180-grain (and heavier) rounds can handle most of the biggest game just about anywhere.

Was “everything in between” mentioned?

Sure, there’s the old adage about the placement of a shot being the most important part of the terminal ballistics equation, but this round makes it a bit easier.  Any animal hit within their terminal area is going to be hard pressed to take even a few more moments in life.

You cannot underestimate the round that has had more impact than any other North American medium and big game round; you certainly can’t knock a gun which performs hundreds of thousands of times a season without flaw, and there really isn’t an animal on most continents that can’t be killed with a well-placed projectile flying out of a .30-06 muzzle.

©2012 Off the Grid News

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45 comments

  1. I would have to disagree on this rifle. There expensive and get dirt into them where dirt shouldn’t be. I was looking into buying one in 300 win mag. A friend of mine owned a gunshop and sometimes knows people wanting to sell one. He told me a lady brought one in, in 3006 and it wouldn’t work right. Not sure what exactly was the problem. He stripped it and it was clean, but when he got into all the mech’s found dirt and grime in strange places. I went with a used Remingtom 742 in 3006, cheaper, more reilible and I can change magazines quickly and there only 40-50 dollars.

    • Try the Winchester 100 in my opinion the best of the lot ! I would take this over the Browning BAR, Remington 742/7400 any day of the week . It is equal in quality and craftmanship, reliability and accuracy. Although they were only made from 1961-72 and only around 270,000 at that they still can be found anywhere in the $500 range depending on condition.

      • Owned two of them, beautiful weapon. Both .243 and .308. the .243 I used for several years, several deer was the end result. The .308 was a disappointment but I bought it cheap at a hock shop, it slam fired when I got it home. Parted out on Ebay for 3X what I paid for it so I was happy.

    • Nonsense, comparatively the Remington is a low end cheap beginners rifle. Look at the fit and finish and especially the hammer spring. The Remington looks like a toy. Oh yeah, I don’t suggest you fire military surplus ammo out of it, you won’t like the results. Dirty? That would be how it was abused, they aren’t designed to be buried in mud.

  2. I have owned a BAR 30/06 for 10 years.
    It has been my main hunting rifles for that time.
    It is well made and finished rifle that is rather accurate.
    I can get .5 inches or less @ 100 yards.
    If you are a reloader the 30/06 is perfect for all the game I will ever hunt.
    You can load it slow and heavy and light and fast and it works great in both loadings.
    It is not perfect though, everything forward of the magazine rests on the barrel, so if you are looking for long range accuracy you can’t use a bipod and must rest the magazine on a sand bag or something. The barrel will heat up after 4 shots resulting in a loss of accuracy. The other thing is, that the trigger is not perfect and may need a good gunsmiths magic touch.

    (Note I said GOOD gunsmith, not one that will make it dangerous.)

    As far as dirt in strange places… that could have to do with poor maintenance maybe she should get an AK!!!

    I love mind…

    The Viking

    • “old blue” 1984 elk engravings “old blue 2 ” same
      I clean her
      every summer and after every winter. Shot over 30 deer up here in wisconsin north of hwy 8. Shot 8 point bucks from 300 yds over corn and thick brush country of park falls. Never trailed a deer. Its fast reliable and drops them. I have dropped several multiple doe from long
      range ridges to thick big timber. Best 30-06 made ! ! 180 GRAIN CORE LOCK from farm and fleet at 18.00 a box never fails. Yes they shoot high after a few rounds but so do my two garands. Physics hot barrel use Kentucky windage. 165 Grain is the best they saybut I have never not gotten a buck with a 180 grain. Old mark 1 best they ever made. Now when you hunt in -10 degree weather don’t use wd 40 use silicone or rem oil. You will not go wrong with BAR MK 1

  3. I have a Browning A-bolt 7mm rem-mag with the BOSS and the only rifle I would consider trading it for is the BAR.

  4. I just bought a BAR in 7mag last week built back in ’79. Had some 7mag loads lying around from eight years ago when I still had my 7mag. I put three rounds in the bod mag and fired the rifle. It shot fine and cycled ok or so I thought. The secound round did not fire, so I ejected that round and fired the third after reloading the second round back in the mag. Same thing happened. Was ready to take the rifle back to the retailer but decided to strip and clean it first. Found the problem. The last owner had oiled the gas ejection system and the piston was stuck. There were no signs of powder fouling which, as I understand it can cause cycling problems when using a real slow a burning powder. The piston did show signs of rust pitting so, the rifle had not been fired for some time. I think barrel heating after sucessive shots will only be an issue at the range and copper removal from the barrel will be undertaked with each outing to maintain accuracy.

  5. This is gonna sound bad,,,,,, but when I think of sex symbols, I think of Bardot, Welch and Munroe….. When I think of BAR I think of Bonnie and clydes demise……….. John Browning was a prophet in the gun world,,,, the BAR and MA Deuce (whom I am still maddly in love with, the sweetest old war lady since Athena) 4th War and Ma Duece and 1911 still reign……
    I do not own a BAR, but the Browing moddle cannot be beat……. if it fouled up….. it was probably your fault (crappy ammo) If I got a chance at a BAR under $500 I would take it in a heart beat…………
    Any caliber……….. but I do like 30.06 because Bardot was hot, Welch was hot,,,, BAR’s wuz hot………
    But I am a hopless romantic ( that is why I have a pair of SAA Colts) cus they are hot!!
    OH yeah,,,, ma deuce is the M2 50 cal machine gun…… before you die,,,,, you must get on one.
    Pointy end down range, grab the things that look like broom handles and with your thumbs push down on the things that look like butterfly wings…….. you WILL be a convert and in love………guaranteed!!!
    The Col

  6. The 30/06 is probably the most versatile cartridge available in the U.S.
    It is true that 06 surplus is getting harder to get than 7.62×51.
    availability of commercial ammo is equal between them, normally you can find a load to do the job in either of them. In almost every store that sells ammo you will find both on the shelf if not sold out.

    As far as the browning goes, it is for those who have a lot of disposable cash.
    It in my opinion should be on a trophy rack next to your favorite game carcass, not in the field.
    i have found in over 50 years of gun smithing, the steels used by European manufacturers does not have the corrosive resistance of US steels.
    I am not stumping for Remington, I only like their shotguns, but their rifles are far more utilitarian and a lot cheaper. Used ones can be had for a reasonable price. The older ones are better made.
    They are common in either 308 or 30/06.
    I only see a tiny amount of them for repair based on its proliferation, mostly owner caused failures.
    Neither is made to shoot large quantities of ammo like an m-1 Garand and that should be taken into consideration.
    Stay away from the older winchester semi-auto’s such as the mod 100, they are prone to failure and always have been.
    As with any, before being put away after season end, should be cleaned and oiled, at least oiled in and out..

    • The 30-06 is by far a more performance oriented and versatile round than the .308 ever dreamed of being! The simple fact is that there still aren’t any major ammo manufacturers offering any sporting loads over 180grs. for the .308, where as the 30-06 has been loaded from 55gr. bullets all the way up to 250grs. This difference is due to cartridge dimensional and chamber differences between the civilian .308 and the military 7.62x51mm Nato spec. cartridges! You can check these spec differrences out at (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.62×51mm_NATO‎).
      My point is simply, that the author seems a little uncertain of his choice of rifle and caliber, along with the fact that his statements about the .45-70 and the availability of military 7.62×51 surplus ammo, which in reality has dried up recently too! Perhaps, some of these other guys espousing that other rifles are just as good or better have made a valid point!

      • Yes, the less powerful .308 is definitly not a substitute for the more versatile .3006 and there are differences between the 7.62×51 and .308 winnie that people should be aware of! See (http://www.thegunzone.com/30cal.html). Mitch, Blucorsair and some of the other fellows here have made valid points in the fact that sometimes more expensive guns are not necessarily the better guns. The author indeed fails to point out sinificant advantages of the BAR and seems very indecisive about calibur choices! Automatic hunting rifles really aren’t my niche, but if I were going to choose one it would probably be the Remington 742, which seems to have been a more durable rifle and less finicky over the years than the BAR. …this is just my opinion and not ment to offend anyone.

      • I bought a BAR made in 1971 two years ago. Paid $500 plus FFL fees for an engraved edition with a Vari 2 scope on it in 30 06. I can sister 4 shots at 100 yards on a rest pretty consistently. I have little frame of reference, but i can’t imagine a better rifle for the money. Probably have 250 rounds through it with no failures related to the rifle. Had a failure with aged bulk ammo that I no longer use.

    • after the mess Remington made of the marlin 39a I would not buy a Remington anything. the Remington 39a will not shoot accurately. messed a good rifle.

  7. Let me tell you about the Winchester model 100 , I have had one and hunted with it for over thirty-five years and had ONE malfunction , my fault for not cleaninng the gas system enough , I like the BAR as well but it is out of my price range . My model 100 is in 308 and has ALWAYS done the job , I still have the old Redfield Wide Angle scope on it , the one with the oval view . Both work great .

    • You are one of the lucky ones. As I said, my opinion is based on over 50 years of gunsmithing.
      The 100 was the most brought in for repairs of the commercial self loaders.
      For the most part it was failure of gas system parts.
      Many had factory oversize gas ports that would rip the base right off the case, these were sent back for re-barreling.

      • Just to add a note here.
        This last week I repaired another one. Again it was the gas system.
        The rifle was frozen so tight that it took a half hour to open the action to remove it..
        Why anyone would make a rifle that had to have the action open to remove from the stock is beyond me.
        Had to make a new piston for it. made it out of stainless steel.
        The customer paid over $285.00 for me to make it.
        He was advised up front the cost, he had to have his Wini mod 100 working.

        BACK TO ARTICLE, A BAR IS A GREAT RIFLE FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT CAN AFFORD THE COST, MOST OF US CANNOT JUSTIFY IT.

        • mitch ! then which made 30.06 you will recmend for us . i mean the best according to you ?

          • i am going to buy a 30.06 .but have no idea what make 30.06 is the best .pls help me as you are a gunsmith.

          • Superblackhawk

            There are many good 30.06 rifles. I have many. Just like any other tool what you buy should be relative to what you plan to use it for, weather etc. need more info to even make a recomendation

    • Have em both! Love my Win M100 for deer hunting, and my MKII Safari in 300 win mag for elk.

  8. canadian-snowbird

    My brother and I both bought BAR 338 Winchester Magnums for moose in heavy cover. We sighted our scopes in at 1 inch over centre at 100 yards, and 0 at 200 yards. I took a long time taking my second shot, and when I did we couldn’t find the bullet hole. We walked back to the target and found out that my second shot at a new target was plumb dead centre. My brother repeated the same thing for his rifle, but he was off centre by less than 1/2 inch high, so we left his scope alone.

    The following year my wife wanted to come on a hunt, so we bought a BAR in 30.06 for her. We had the butt shortened for her. The following year a hunting buddy wanted to borrow a rifle, so I lent him my wife’s gun. After his hunt was over and he was home he called me and wanted to buy her rifle. I told him to buy another BAR because the stock wasn’t set up for a man of his bulk and height. Our moose hunting days ended when my brother died, but I now cherish his BAR as part of my gun collection. I have two boys and a daughter, and my daughter has her possession and acquisition license. Now the two boys want to get their licenses as well, now that the Canadian long-gun registration has been rescinded by the Canadian Parliament.

    I own several Brownings, and the only problem I had was when I lent out my semi-auto shotgun to my boss. It came back with specks of rust on the blued barrel and receiver. It was the last time I lent a gun to anyone.

    I cannot say enough about the built quality of the Browning rifles and shotguns, or their superb accuracy.

  9. Just got my 4th BAR. Two I sold for some unknown reason (insanity?) now, so wanted another one back. All 4 have been used guns in nice shape. One had a ding in the rifling before I got it (didn’t see the defect at time of buying). Lousy groups as you would figure. That one had to go of course. The other two would out shoot most bolt rifles in the hands of my hunter friends. They all loved shooting the guns and couldn’t believe the accuracy (plus classy good looks). All guns are .30-06; great round. Would try one in .270 for mule deer out here in Washington State. All mine have been super reliable with either handloads or factory ammo. A bit softer shooting, I think, than my Remington 742 in .30-06. Everybody appreciates the real good looks and quality construction. Keeping this one. My fiance may want one of her own after shooting mine (just like my handguns- lol)

  10. I have no experience with the BAR, save for the military version. As for the 30-06 or even the .308, I agree they are very capable of taking anything on the North American Continent what with the loading up or down in bullets weights as needed for the intended game.

    • 30-06 or 308 both good, I am amazed at all these new cartridges that are bigger better and faster than a good old 30 caliber. 30-06 can take any animal in NA. So will a 308. I have 7 30-06’s just had to reduce ammo, 2 GARANDS, 5 BROWNINGS. Lately with ammo I think either is good just keep the same cal. to reduce costs.

      Bullet placement is the factor not caliber

  11. I bought my Remington 700 about 5o years ago. I was newly married and the kids started coming so I didn’t have a lot of free cash. I bought it used from a friend who did a lot of reloading for me. He said the guy he got it from never used it because he also bought a Browning and never got around to the Remington. Over the years I’ve taken a lot (100 +) of deer and lots of other game with it. It really showed itself, up in the Arctic, caribou hunting. There is no arguing the quality and finish of a Browning and I do love the ones I have but nothing compares with the marvelously accurate bolt action Remington 700 30-06. I later learned that the 308 and 30-06 were the weapon of choice of most snipers at the time. It just confirmed my own opinion. Sorry if this is a little wordy but one can’t say enough about the unflashy but very utile Remington 30-06.

  12. We have had a Belgium Browning BAR 30-06 in my family for almost 30 years. I have had it for the last 10 or so. I have never had a problem with mine. I have never had dirt in it and I take my BAR hunting each year from open field hunting to dense woods hunting. The rifle will always stay in my family no matter what. Hands down the best and most reliable rifle I have ever owned and I have owned most rifles.

  13. Why not just go with a Garand as it is a tougher rifle and gives all the benifits of the 30-06 without the hassle. Easy to field strip if needed and it can take a beating love mine and only gave to my stepson as getting on in years. So I’ll stick with the old bolt action WW1rifle as it to is a great shooter and can take a beating.

  14. For my money the Lee Enfield 303 is the only rifle you will ever need. Millions were made and still in use World wide and the ammo is readily available.

  15. I’ve enjoyed reading about the Browning and the Remington’s in this article. However, the one that always felt the best in my hands is my Johnson. My wife really enjoys it too. I clean it after every time I use it, sometimes she helps with this, so it’s ready to go again in just a few minutes. My wife likes that it’s a great size for her and it always hits dead center with good penetration. Sometimes I’ll line it up about two inches below the target. That used to really make her mad, but she eventually grew to accept it. She’ll never admit it, but I know she enjoys it. We usually practice with my Johnson indoors, but I’ve been teaching her the best way to field strip a Johnson in an actual field. We enjoy shooting as much as possible, but it’s hard to get my wife to use anything other than my Johnson. Happy Hunting!!!

  16. Can the Clip receptacle on a AR Browing Auto Rifle 30.06 be modified to incorporate a larger clip?

  17. I got on for Christmas in 1974, the last year we had a fantastic deer lease in the lower Pecos in Texas. We rocked the canyons and seldom got a standing shot.Most were running and a 150 yard shot at a shooter was close. No feeder, food plots. Just the gun and hunter. Since owning the gun I have shot about 2-3 boxes through it and the gun never jammed, had any problems with dirt ?, and is the most beautiful rifle i have ever held. I have only had one deer get by me and that was a result of a branch being between the buck and me. I would never let the gun go as my son will get it, I still looks brand new. In 2/2011 I saw a 146 about 160 yards away right at dusk in S. Texas. i spotted the deer, eased a bullet in the chamber, slowly squeezed my hand as the site was on the deers shoulder and shot. i heard the bullet hit the deer and got to the spot ASAP as I had about 10 minutes of light left. I went 30 yards and the buck was belly up and would have been a B & C but he broke the grow times off fighting. Nailed him right in the front shoulder. The browning gun is the best bar none. I am now 58 and got a used 12 Ga. Belgium made with a vent rib barrel when I was 16 years of age. It is the only shot gun I have ever owned and all of my duck and dove hunting buddies (6) all got the same gun as the gun has a farther knock down distance as the barrel is a superior design. I shoot dove and geese with the same barrel and modifies chock. I only with I knew how many green heads, dove, quail other ducks and geese I have killed with the one and only shot gun i will ever own. I shoot a shot gun fairly well and my friends and dad always commented on the number of birds I could knock down. In truth I told them it was not much of my shooting ability but the quality of the gun. Now every one i hunt birds with has a Belgium A5 12 ga.

  18. The BAR, as a full auto/semi-auto combat rifle in WWII and before was prone to jamming. I am sure they have solved this problem. Personally, I like the idea of a semi-automatic rifle with a detachable magazine. You buy lots of spare magazines and remove the bottoms. Then you get some sheet metal, some tin snips, and some quality, constant pressure springs. You cut the sheet metal and bend it (they make a tool for this, available at any store that sells sheet metal supplies, or HVAC stuff. The tool looks like pliers, but the jaws are wide like a hammer head shark’s head). The sheet metal is bent in a rectangular, cross- sectional shape to match the factory magazine. A bottom is put on, the spring is inserted, and you attach it to the bottom of the factory mag, either with a quality epoxy wire-feed welder, or perhaps rivets. The shape, as seen from the side, will usually need to curve forward in a constant arc to facillitate smooth feeding. Experiment a bit, and VOILA!!! You have a dreaded “Assault Rifle,” as defined by the professional liars in the liberal alphabet networks. Right now this should be legal almost everywhere, do it before high capacity magazines are once again illegal to manufacture……………… Of course, consult with a good lawyer before you do this, even in the privacy of your own home. Don’t call the police and ask if it’s legal, because if it’s not they’ll say “Yes,” then wait for you to do it, then bust you for minding your own business. Be carefull, and keep your mouth shut.

    • Sorry, folks. Insert a comma between “epoxy” and “wire-feed” in the previous comment. There is no such thing as an epoxy AND wire-feed welder.

  19. Superblackhawk

    I have had my BAR 30.06 for over 20 years. I have been hunting for over 40 years and have owned just about ebery rifle you could imagine. About the comment about using an MI Garand. Garands are not made to use the high preassure 30.06 loads of today. The BAR is flawless in function, but not keeping the gas system spotless will creat problems. It goes back to quality ammo, (I load my own) and good cleaning habits. If you just want to soak a gun with WD-40 and swab the barrel. Do not get a BAR. If you are up to educating yourself about how to take care of this timless classic, then by all means get one. I just picked up anotherone at a local gun show for $450 in 270 cal. I have taken counless dear, six elk and two bear with this gun as well as beheaded many grouse. I have never owned a finer more dependable rifle.

  20. What am I missing here? Oh..,the title said the “TEN Best Hunting Rifles”, then proceeded to tell us about the Browning BAR. ? Hmm, that’s one. Now I don’t have anything against the BAR, love to have one. IF given a choice of the BEST ‘hunting’ rifle it would definitely be a BOLT-action, not a semi auto. Most people would recognize the fact that a bolt rifle IS going to be more accurate, more durable and less problematic in terms of failing to fire, for issues unknown. The fact that SOMEONE writing this article chose a BAR is purely prejudicial and bias for the Browning BAR. Still need to FINISH THE ARTICLE…

  21. Traded a Remington 700 BDL IN ON BRAND NEW BAR 30-06 IN MID 70’S ALL THESE YEARS I HAVE MISSED ONLY ONE DEER. JUST RECENTLY UPDATED SCOPE TO 3X12X56 ZEISS DIAVARI ILLUMINATED. WooooooooooW
    NOW MY SON DOESN’T WANT TO GO BACK TO HIS A-BOLT. THINKING ABOUT NEW BAR CAMO VERSION WITH ZEISS SCOPE SO MY SON CAN SHOOT MY OLD ONE.
    FOR MY MONEY BROWNING MAKES THE BEST, I ALSO HAVE THE BROWNING A-5 BELGIUM.

  22. i have a browning long trac 30.06 and will out shoot any remington winchester semi ever made owned 742 7400 100 all are junk compared to the long trac mine has never jammed since iv’e had it the remingtons and winchesters iv’e had all would has a great trigger and will shoot a three shot group you can cover with a dime every time you get what you pay for spend the money and get a real rifle get a long trac

  23. Bruno Bernatchez

    I have 4 rifles Browning 1 – BLR 30-06, 1 – 30-06 BBR made ​​in Japan barrel 4 fillets
    not accurate, I have a 22 and a 22 BAR BLR Made in Japan no accuracy.
    By-against Browning made ​​in Belgium, I shoot with my 30-06 BAR chum fillets and it is 6 100
    rod was drawn 2 bullets in the same hole and the 3rd a-half lead left and a 4th-half lead to the right of the center hole top quality fai in Belgium and I shoot with a BBR is in Belgium
    6 fillets same accuracy, please do not buy 4 fillets lot less accurate.
                                                  Bruno Bernatchez

  24. I have 4 rifles Browning 1 – BLR 30-06, 1 – 30-06 BBR made ​​in Japan barrel 4 fillets
    not accurate, I have a 22 and a 22 BAR BLR Made in Japan no accuracy.
    By-against Browning made ​​in Belgium, I shoot with my 30-06 BAR chum fillets and it is 6 100
    rod was drawn 2 bullets in the same hole and the 3rd a-half lead left and a 4th-half lead to the right of the center hole top quality fai in Belgium and I shoot with a BBR is in Belgium
    6 fillets same accuracy, please do not buy 4 fillets lot less accurate.
                                                  Bruno

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